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Fear Ends Where Faith Begins

Sikhi-Faith

SRI GURU ANGAD DEV JI

Pita Ji - Feru Malh Ji

Mata Ji - Daya Kaur Ji

Parkash Asthan - Matte Di Saraye (Dist - Ferozpur)

Parkash Miti - 18 - 04 - 1504

Supatni - Kheevi Ji

Santaan - Dasoo Ji, Datoo Ji, Bibi Amro Ji Anokhi Ji

Gureyayi Miti Te Samaan - 18 - 09 - 1539, 12 saal 9 mahine

Joti Jot - 16 - 04 - 1552

Lagbhag Umar - 48 saal

Guru Angad Dev was born on March 31, 1504 in a village called Harike in Ferozepur district of the Punjab. His father, Bhai Pheru was a trader. His parents called him Lehna. He was married at the age of fifteen. His wife, Khivi was a native of Mattei di Sarai in Ferozepur district. His father grew weary of Harike and with his family returned to his ancestral place, Mattei di Sarai and lived there. Bhai Lehna's wife gave birth to two daughters, Amro and Anokhi, and two sons called Dasu and Datu.

When Mattei di Sarai was sacked by the Mughals and Baloches, Bhai Lehna and his father moved to Khadur, now a famous town near Tarn Taran. Bhai Lehna grew very religious under the influence of his mother, Daya Kaur, and became a devotee of Durga, the goddess of Shakti. He used to organize yearly pilgrimage of devout Hindus to Jawalamukhi, a place of Durga temple in the lower Himalayas where fire issued from the mountains. He used to lead Durga dance around the fire in a harness of jingling bells.

Bhai Jodha, a Guru's Sikh, lived in Khadur and it was his daily routine to rise early every morning and recite Japji and Asa di Var. One day as Bhai Lehna attentively listened the Divine Sabad recited by Bhai Jodha, his mind obtained peace. After the day break he asked Jodha who had composed that stimulating hymn. Bhai Jodha then told him all about Guru Nanak, who was living at Kartarpur at that time. The touch of Divine Sabad made such an impact on Bhai Lehna's mind that he got impatient to meet the Guru. When he was on his annual pilgrimage to Jawalamukhi, he broke his journey at Kartarpur to offer his obeisance to the Guru. During his meeting, the Guru spoke to him of the True Creator, leaving such an impression on Bhai Lehna that he threw away the jingling bells, which he was carrying with him to dance before the goddess. He had obtained such a peace of mind that he decided to discontinue his pilgrimage and abide with the Guru. On seeing his increasing devotion, the Guru said to him one day that he should go home and settle his affairs and on his return he would initiate him as his Sikh. Upon this Bhai Lehna returned to Khadur for some time.

A detailed account has been given in the last chapter regarding the circumstances which led to his succession to Guruship. One day as Sikhs assembled, Guru Nanak seated Bhai Lehna on his throne, put five paise and a coco‑nut in front of him and bowed before him and then said to Bhai Buddha,"This is my successor‑ Guru Angad; put a tilak on his forehead in token of his appointment to the Guruship." Bhai Buddha did so. The Guru then ordered his followers to obey and serve Guru Angad; who was in his own image. Bhai Gurdas describes the succession to Guru Angad (Var 1, pauri‑45):

"Angad got the same tilak, the same umbrella over his head, and was seated on the same true throne as Guru Nanak. The seal of Guru Nanak's hand entered Guru Angad's, and proclaimed his sovereignty."
After his appointment to the Guruship, Guru Nanak directed Guru Angad to return to Khadur. Upon this Guru Angad returned to Khadur and lived there.

Some of the limelights of Guruji's life:

GURU SITS IN SECLUSION

EMPEROR HUMAYUN COMES TO GURU

GURMUKHI SCRIPT

BABA AMAR DAS COMES TO GURU ANGAD

CITY OF GOINDWAL

GURU ANGAD & TAPA

 

Sikh Guru Sahiban